The last monarch migration?

Over the past two decades, the monarch butterfly population has decreased by 68%.

This chronic decline isn't due to natural causes. The Washington Post called it "nothing short of a massacre."

How so? Pollution-driven climate change is part of the problem. But we're also allowing the destruction of the monarchs' habitat and food source through the rapid acceleration in use of Monsanto's toxic Roundup and Roundup Ready crops. 

It just doesn't make sense  

We're endangering the existence of one of our most beautiful creatures in order to serve the interests of one of the world's most powerful corporations, and for what?

So it can sell massive amounts of toxic herbicides? No part of that makes sense. 

That's why we're calling on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to declare the monarch butterfly a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. 

Together, we can save the monarch

If we succeed, we'll give the monarchs more than a fighting chance. When it comes to preventing extinction, the Endangered Species Act has a 99% success rate. But we have to act now.

Together, we will raise awareness of the monarchs' plight and take action that can save them.

 

Pollinator updates

Campuses go renewable

College campuses across the country are playing a major role in the fight to prevent the worst impacts of global warming by committing to go renewable. 

Nine states campaign for 100 percent clean energy

In the wake of Environment California’s successful campaign to commit the Golden State to 100 percent clean electricity generation by 2045, PennEnvironment is launching a multi-year campaign to convince America to set similar goals to transition to clean energy.

Choose wildlife over waste

Plastic foam cups and containers are ending up in our oceans, polluting our water and harming wildlife. We can choose wildlife over waste.

Climate solutions from day one

America’s newly elected governors can take bold action on the greatest challenge of our time: climate change.

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