Coal, gas and nuclear — we can do better

The ways that we produce and use energy in Pennsylvania have a severe impact on our environment and health. PennEnvironment is working toward a new energy future that promotes clean, renewable energy and uses efficient technologies to help protect the planet.

Pennsylvania could be doing a lot better when it comes to the ways we use and produce our energy. Dirty, coal-fired power plants pollute our air with smog and soot, and our rivers and streams with mercury. Marcellus Shale gas drilling contaminates our streams and destroys our pristine forests. Nuclear power plants produce toxic waste, and pose the unlikely but catastrophic threat of a Fukushima-style disaster.

Powerful polluters push for the dirty energy status quo

Unfortunately, many electricity companies, coal companies and other polluters want to continue our reliance on dirty energy sources. These powerful interests are putting short-term profits ahead of our environment and health — and they have unfettered access and influence in the halls of the state capitol in Harrisburg and in Washington, D.C. Electric utilities spent more than $105 million on lobbying in 2011 alone.  Now they're pushing to cut Pennsylvania's critical Advanced Energy Portfolio Standard, which supports clean energy sollutions like wind and solar.  

Solar and wind offer path to a new energy future

At PennEnvironment, we have a different vision. We can get our energy from clean, renewable homegrown sources like wind and solar, while creating thousands of much-needed jobs in the state. We can achieve a new energy future where our homes and buildings create more clean energy than they need, where public transportation systems thrive and reduce our reliance on oil, and where technology allows our cars to get more than 100 miles to the gallon.

Pennsylvania has the technological know-how and renewable energy potential to clean up and modernize the way we produce energy. Clean, renewable energy sources are in abundance in Pennsylvania — especially wind and solar power — and they can help the Commonwealth decrease its reliance on dirtier, polluting forms of energy.


Clean Energy Updates

News Release | PennEnvironment

Chesco Renewable Energy Expo offers residents tools to use cleaner energy

On Saturday, March 30th, Chesco residents packed the West Whiteland Township Building to learn more about renewable energy businesses in their area. PennEnvironment and Sierra Club’s Chester County Ready for 100 program hosted a 100% Renewable Energy Expo & Discussion in Exton, PA. Throughout the afternoon, over 150 Chester County residents explored clean energy and energy efficiency business exhibits to learn how they could transition their home to cleaner resources and help reduce their carbon footprint.

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Blog Post

With longer days ahead, cities should lean in on solar | Emma Searson

Today marks the first official day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. Known as the spring equinox because the day and night each last almost exactly 12 hours, it’s a cause for celebration for many who, like me, are eager to leave the cold and darkness of winter behind. This is also a great time for our communities to lean in and make the most of capturing the sun’s power with each growing day.

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News Release | Environment America

University of California, Berkeley, commits to 100% clean energy

The University of California, Berkeley, will transition to 100 percent clean, renewable sources for all of its energy, including heating, transportation and electricity by 2050. This announcement builds on the commitment by the University of California system to purchase all of of its electricity from renewable sources by 2025.

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News Release | Environment America

U.S. Department of Energy’s proposed repeal of lighting efficiency standards a huge blow to planet’s health

The U.S. Department of Energy is holding a public meeting today on its plan to revoke Obama-era rules that required higher energy efficiency standards for lighting. The regulations, which had been scheduled to take effect in January 2020, would have saved twice as much energy as any other efficiency regulation in history.  The light bulb standard rollback would result in an additional 34 million metric tons of climate-altering carbon dioxide by 2025.

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News Release | PennEnvironment

ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS TO PHILLY CITY COUNCIL: WE WILL NOT ENDORSE CANDIDATES WHO VOTE IN SUPPORT OF NEW FOSSIL FUEL PROJECT

[Philadelphia, PA] – As Philadelphia City Council prepares to vote on a controversial fossil fuel project this week, major environmental groups announced that a vote in support of this project will automatically disqualify incumbent councilmembers from receiving the organizations’ endorsements.

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