100% Clean. 100% Possible.

Burning fossil fuels like oil, gas and coal has polluted our air, water and land for decades. Now it’s changing our climate, even faster than scientists feared it would. But we can have healthier communities right now and a livable future for kids growing up today. To get there, we need to transform the way we produce and consume energy.

That's why we’re calling for a statewide and nationwide commitment to 100% renewable power.

It’s a big, bold goal. But it’s also one that would make America a world leader in the race toward a cleaner, healthier future — and it’s a goal that’s 100% possible.

Apple, Facebook, Google and more

Companies and municipalities are already committing to 100% renewable energy.

Consider: Companies ranging from Apple, Google and Facebook to Johnson & Johnson and Coca Cola have already committed to going 100% renewable. So have cities like Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and others.

Some cities around the country like Greensburg, Kan., Burlington, Vt. and Aspen, Colo., have already achieved 100% renewable energy.

Going 100% renewable is 100% possible.

This has dovetailed with solar power installations tripling in America in just the last two years — there is a new home or business going solar every one and a half minutes. In many states, wind power is now cheaper than gas or coal. Clean energy keeps growing faster, with prices for consumers and businesses dropping lower than even the most optimistic industry predictions of just a few years ago.

But we can do more, and we must do more to stave off the worst effects of climate change.

We need to keep building momentum

It’s time to stop letting some slow-moving politicians drag their feet, and start pushing them to step up and lead.

It’s time to sweep past the big energy interests — from Big Oil and gas companies like ExxonMobil and Chevron to utilities like Duke Energy and Pacific Gas & Electric, from climate deniers in Congress to the Koch brothers — that are not only standing in the way, but using their financial might and political clout to roll back renewable energy’s progress.

Join our call, and help your community go 100% renewable.

The more people who join our call for 100% renewable power, the more local, state, national and corporate leaders will step up and take action that will make a difference now and get us on the right track for the future.

 Solutions can't wait

We can’t wait any longer: Scientists say we must stop burning fossil fuels by 2050 in order to our spare kids growing up today from the devastating impacts of climate change.
And why should we wait?

Why wait for healthier communities with cleaner air and water when we can have them today?

Why wait until it’s impossible to leave our kids a safer, healthier tomorrow?

Why wait, when we can start changing the conversation about how we produce and consume energy — so it’s no longer a question of whether we’ll get to 100% renewable power, but how fast?

Why wait, when America has the responsibility, the ingenuity and the will to start leading the world to a 100% renewable future right now?

Steven Gilbert

We’ve got the power 

We’re ready for this. PennEnvironment and our national network at Environment America have been working aggressively  to promote solar and wind power, and energy efficiency and conservation at the state and local levels. We’ve won clean energy policies, from pro-solar initiatives to clean cars programs to renewable energy standards, all of which are driving down the costs of wind and solar power, and driving down carbon pollution.

Now we need you to join this movement and the first step is an easy one: Add your name in support of a 100% renewable future.

Together, we can do this. A 100% renewable future based on 100% American-made energy is 100% possible. And it starts now.

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Windmill farm in Bradford County, PA showing a gas drillng fracking fluids reservoir. Photo Credit: Don Biresch. click here for source.

100% Clean Energy Updates

News Release | PennEnvironment

Statement: Pittsburgh City Council plans to ban plastic bags

PITTSBURGH -- Pittsburgh City Council passed a resolution Tuesday stating their intent to pass a citywide ban on single-use plastic bags, were it not for a state law preempting local governments from doing so. The resolution, introduced last week by Councilmember Erika Strassburger, means Pennsylvania’s two largest cities could soon join forces to protect the Commonwealth from plastic pollution and the health and environmental degradation it causes. In March, Philadelphia, along with the boroughs of West Chester and Narberth, and Lower Merion Township, filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the General Assembly’s preemption law. The passage of Councilmember Strassburger’s resolution opens the door for the City of Pittsburgh to file a legal motion in support of that suit.

> Keep Reading
News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

New Study: PA electric vehicle program expansion could lead to 18-million-ton yearly reduction in state’s climate pollution

PHILADELPHIA – Pennsylvania could reduce its climate pollution by 18 million metric tons annually -- the equivalent of taking nearly 4 million gas-powered vehicles off the road --  by expanding its clean cars program to include a Zero Emissions Vehicles (ZEV) program, according to a new study released Thursday.  This report comes out just after the state’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) proposed the Keystone State embrace a ZEV program. 

> Keep Reading
Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Cleaner Cars for PA

Transportation is one of Pennsylvania’s leading sources of the air pollution that harms our health and contributes to global warming. One-quarter of Pennsylvania’s greenhouse gas emissions come from transportation and more than a third of the nitrogen oxide emissions that contribute to harmful ozone smog come from highway vehicles.

> Keep Reading
News Release | PennEnvironment

Statement: Pittsburgh City Council takes crucial first step to eliminate plastic bag pollution

PITTSBURGH -- Pennsylvania’s two largest cities could soon join forces to protect the Commonwealth from plastic pollution and the health and environmental degradation it causes. Councilmember Erika Strassburger introduced a resolution Tuesday announcing the Pittsburgh City Council’s intent to pass a citywide ban on single-use plastic bags, were it not for a state law preempting local governments from doing so. In March, Philadelphia, along with the boroughs of West Chester and Narberth, and Lower Merion Township, filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the General Assembly’s preemption law. The passage of Councilmember Strassburger’s resolution would open the door for the City of Pittsburgh to file a legal motion in support of that suit. 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment America

Statement: By passing a Congressional Review Act resolution, Senate takes valuable step toward reversing catastrophic methane rule

WASHINGTON -- In a bipartisan vote, the Senate passed a Congressional Review Act resolution on Wednesday undoing a Trump-era rollback of methane emission controls. The resolution was introduced in March by Sens. Martin Heinrich of New Mexico, Ed Markey of Massachusetts and Angus King of Maine. Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Susan Collins of Maine joined Democrats in voting for resolution. A similar resolution is pending in the House, introduced by Reps. Diana DeGette of Colorado, Scott Peters of California and Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania.

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