News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

New report: Electric school buses could protect PA kids from air pollution, store power for our electrical grid

PHILADELPHIA -- As early as next month, billions of new federal dollars will start to become available for school districts across Pennsylvania and the nation to transition to clean, electric school buses. Today, most of the country’s nearly half a million school buses run on diesel fuel, producing harmful emissions that children are forced to breathe. With the support of the World Resources Institute’s Electric School Bus Initiative, PennPIRG Education Fund, PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center and Frontier Group are releasing a new report examining how the transition to electric school buses, in addition to keeping diesel exhaust out of developing lungs, could help speed up the expansion of clean energy by providing a critical source of reliable battery storage.

News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

PennEnvironment Statement: First-of-its-kind penalty announced against U.S. Steel over rotten egg pollution

PITTSBURGH --  The Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) announced Monday a $1.8 million fine against U.S. Steel for more than 150 violations of emissions limits on hydrogen sulfide, a pollutant known for its distinctive rotten-egg smell. This is the first penalty ever issued by ACHD in the agency’s history for violations of the state’s limits on hydrogen sulfide pollution.  In their announcement, ACHD cited more than 150 violations from January 1, 2020 to March 1, 2022. This comes on the heels of an $860,000 fine issued on March 3, 2022  for separate air pollution violations from the second half of 2021, as well as an ongoing citizen enforcement suit in federal court to address a 102-day outage of air pollution controls at the company’s Clairton Coke Works, filed by PennEnvironment and Clean Air Council and joined by ACHD.

News Release | PennEnvironment

Statement: EPA returns authority to Pennsylvania and 16 other states to limit pollution from cars, trucks

Philadelphia, PA -- To promote clean air and expedite a reduction of transportation emissions, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced Wednesday it would restore California’s clean cars waiver under the Clean Air Act. The waiver allows California to enforce its stricter Advanced Clean Cars program, and lets other states with air pollution problems like Pennsylvania to choose to adopt those stronger rules. This action undoes the Trump administration’s attempt to block states from setting stronger tailpipe emissions standards than the federal government. 

Vehicle tailpipes are a major source of health-harming air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. In 2020, millions of Pennsylvanians  were exposed to elevated levels of ozone and/or fine particulate pollution an average of one day a week.

PennEnvironment had called on the Biden administration to strengthen federal fuel economy and vehicle emission standards – and restore states’ authority to determine their own position on this issue – in their "First Things to Fix" report, which outlined 20 environmental protections the president should enact at the start of his term. Pennsylvania is one of 17 states that have adopted the Advanced Clean Cars program.

News Release | Environment America

Sen. Martin Heinrich and expert panel conclude that we need to transition to clean energy in our homes

Environment America and U.S. PIRG hosted a webinar Wednesday, which featured opening words from Sen. Martin Heinrich of New Mexico and a panel of home electrification experts discussing the benefits and process of switching to clean electric technologies

News Release | Environment America

Statement: Federal electric truck, bus investments help to slash air pollution, reduce climate emissions

Vice President Kamala Harris announced several initiatives to reduce diesel pollution from buses and trucks. Federal funding will now be available for electric transit buses and school buses, cleaner port vehicles and more. In addition, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a proposed rule to reduce pollution from heavy-duty trucks that will accelerate the deployment of zero-emission technology.

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