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Statement on Congress voting for Climate Action Now Act: First climate bill in a decade to pass the U.S. House of Representatives

For Immediate Release

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 9 “The Climate Action Now” Act today by a margin of 231-190. Yes votes included Pennsylvania Representatives Brian Fitzpatrick (PA- 01), Brendan Boyle (PA-02), Dwight Evans (PA-03), Madeleine Dean (PA-04), Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05), Chrissy Houlahan (PA-06), Susan Wild (PA- 07), Matt Cartwright (PA- 08), Conor Lamb (PA-17), and Mike Doyle (PA-18).

This climate bill, the first to receive a vote by the body in a decade, would keep the United States in the Paris Agreement by defunding any effort to withdraw and requiring the Trump administration to submit an annual plan that ensures the U.S. will meet its commitment to reduce carbon emissions below 2005 levels by 26 to 28 percent by 2032.

“When the Pope and the Pentagon agree that we are in crisis, it is time to act. The Climate Action Now Act will keep us in the Paris Agreement, require the President to develop a real emissions plan, and recommit the United States to global climate leadership,” said Representative Madeleine Dean (PA-04).

Co-sponsored by 224 members of Congress, including 8 members of the PA delegation, the bill is an important measure in cutting global warming pollution. Concerted global action is necessary “to combat climate change and to accelerate and intensify the actions and investments needed for a sustainable low carbon future,” according to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Congressman Dwight Evans, PA-03, said, “I’m co-sponsoring and voting for the Climate Action Now Act because human-caused climate change is a real and growing problem. I’m proud that this will be one of the first significant bills passed by the new House majority. Elections have consequences. Voting matters!”

“On the campaign trail, I promised to be a leader in the fight to combat climate change and protect our planet for future generations. Today, I’m proud to say I voted to take action and keep that promise. When we signed the Paris Agreement, the United States made a commitment to progress, and honoring that commitment is key to protecting Americans’ health, national security, and prosperity” said Rep. Susan Wild (PA-07), Co-Chair of the New Democrats’ Coalition Climate Change Task Force

Flora Cardoni, the Climate Defender Campaign Director with PennEnvironment, issued the following statement:

“We applaud the members of the Pennsylvania Congressional Delegation who are taking the existential risks of climate change seriously by voting ‘yes’ on this bill. Americans have been waiting a decade for congressional action on the climate crisis, and we have no more time to waste.  Our communities across the Commonwealth are already threatened by increasing temperatures, extreme downpours and flash flooding, booming tick populations, and many other impacts. If we continue business as usual, Congress places our national security, food and water security, businesses, homes, health and families in harm’s way.

“This bill is a key step in ratcheting down carbon pollution from the burning of dangerous fossil fuels -- oil, natural gas and coal -- as quickly as possible.  By renewing our commitment to the international climate agreement, we recognize that while the risks are great, the opportunity to give our children and grandkids a stable climate and the healthy future they deserves exists, and we can be part of the solution.

“We now call on the Senate to reaffirm this commitment with another ‘yes’ vote. As for the President, we strongly encourage him to reconsider his position on this issue in order to assure that the United States takes its rightful place as a world leader on climate solutions.“

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PennEnvironment is a citizen-based, statewide environmental advocacy organization working to ensure clean air, clean water, and protecting Pennsylvania’s great natural heritage. For more information about this and other PennEnvironment projects, visit www.PennEnvironment.org.