Fracking banned in the Delaware River watershed

For 15 million people, drinking water will stay fracking-free. 

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Mary Katherine Moore
Creative Associate

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Creative Associate

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.

For 15 million people, drinking water will stay fracking-free. 

On Feb. 25, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) finalized a decision to ban fracking within the Delaware River watershed. For more than a decade, Environment New Jersey has presented the DRBC with documentation of fracking threats to clean water. Environment New Jersey also rallied thousands to support the fracking ban, which will protect the wildlife and the water where people swim, fish, play and source drinking water. The DRBC listened.  

"Over the last decade, one thing has become crystal clear — the fracking industry is either unable or unwilling to comply with basic, common sense environmental safeguards,” said David Masur, executive director of PennEnvironment. "When the DRBC unveiled their proposal, tens of thousands of people spoke up in support of a fracking ban."

"Now, we thank the DRBC for listening to Pennsylvanians who know what is best for the commonwealth’s people and natural spaces," added David. 

Read more about the ban.

Learn more about our Don't Frack Pennsylvania campaign. 

ACT NOW

We know that fracking harms our communities, our environment and public health. If we want to secure a cleaner, greener Pennsylvania for future geneerations, then we must transition to renewable energy. 

Tell your legislators to support transitioning Pennsylvania to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050.
 

Photo: The watershed provides drinking water for more than 15 million people, and a home for wildlife, scenic views and opportunities for fishing, swimming and hiking. Credit: Jon Bilous via Shutterstock

Mary Katherine Moore
Creative Associate

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Creative Associate

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.