Coal, gas and nuclear — we can do better

The ways that we produce and use energy in Pennsylvania have a severe impact on our environment and health. PennEnvironment is working toward a new energy future that promotes clean, renewable energy and uses efficient technologies to help protect the planet.

Pennsylvania could be doing a lot better when it comes to the ways we use and produce our energy. Dirty, coal-fired power plants pollute our air with smog and soot, and our rivers and streams with mercury. Marcellus Shale gas drilling contaminates our streams and destroys our pristine forests. Nuclear power plants produce toxic waste, and pose the unlikely but catastrophic threat of a Fukushima-style disaster.

Powerful polluters push for the dirty energy status quo

Unfortunately, many electricity companies, coal companies and other polluters want to continue our reliance on dirty energy sources. These powerful interests are putting short-term profits ahead of our environment and health — and they have unfettered access and influence in the halls of the state capitol in Harrisburg and in Washington, D.C. Electric utilities spent more than $105 million on lobbying in 2011 alone.  Now they're pushing to cut Pennsylvania's critical Advanced Energy Portfolio Standard, which supports clean energy sollutions like wind and solar.  

Solar and wind offer path to a new energy future

At PennEnvironment, we have a different vision. We can get our energy from clean, renewable homegrown sources like wind and solar, while creating thousands of much-needed jobs in the state. We can achieve a new energy future where our homes and buildings create more clean energy than they need, where public transportation systems thrive and reduce our reliance on oil, and where technology allows our cars to get more than 100 miles to the gallon.

Pennsylvania has the technological know-how and renewable energy potential to clean up and modernize the way we produce energy. Clean, renewable energy sources are in abundance in Pennsylvania — especially wind and solar power — and they can help the Commonwealth decrease its reliance on dirtier, polluting forms of energy.


Clean Energy Updates

News Release | PennEnvironment

Citizens Rally to Expand Clean Energy in Pennsylvania

HARRISBURG– More than 100 residents across Pennsylvania traveled to the Capitol today with PennEnvironment to deliver a message to members of the General Assembly: it’s time to play a leadership role in pioneering climate and clean energy solutions.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

Bringing the message of 100 percent renewable energy to the people | Rob Sargent

As President Trump and his administration attempt to roll back decades of environmental progress, we know there’s no time to waste in moving affirmatively to reduce pollution and complete the shift to 100 percent renewable energy. This summer, we’ve got hundreds of folks working in 27 offices in 19 states across the country educating more than 1.5 million Americans about the promise and prospect of re-powering our country with clean energy.

> Keep Reading
News Release | PennEnvironment

Smell Something? Say Something

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's CREATE Lab are rolling out new features in Smell PGH, a smartphone app that helps Pittsburgh area residents collectively report foul odors and alert each other to suspicious smells that waft through city neighborhoods and suburbs.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

Today is the longest day of the year. Let’s capture that sunlight for clean energy. | Bret Fanshaw

Today in the Northern Hemisphere, we experience the longest day of the year, when the sun showers our half of the world with bright and powerful rays of light.

> Keep Reading
News Release | PennEnvironment

Governor Wolf Celebrates New Coal Mine Opposed by Impacted Community Members, Hasn’t Joined US Climate Alliance

Jennerstown, PA - Today, as Governor Wolf joins Corsa Coal in Somerset County for the opening of the Acosta Mine in Jenners Township - a project touted by President Trump as he withdrew from the Paris Accord - Pennsylvania’s commitment to climate action remains uncertain.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed