Carbon pollution threatens our health

Carbon pollution spewing from power plants threatens Pennsylvanians’ health.  Doctors, nurses and scientists warn that it fuels global warming, which triggers poor air quality that makes it harder for children to breathe and contributes to thousands of asthma attacks, heart attacks and other fatal diseases.

Studies show that 836,880 Pennsylvania adults and 228,593 children already suffer from asthma.  Nationwide, smog pollution alone leads to roughly 4,700 premature deaths and 19,000 emergency room visits.  Allowing power plants to continue emitting unlimited amounts of carbon pollution will mean more global warming and dirtier air for Pennsylvanians.

Scientists also warn that global warming is expected to lead to more devastating floods, deadly heat waves and many other threats.

Coal-fired power plants need to be cleaned up

Coal-fired power plants are the largest single source of carbon pollution, yet they currently lack any federal limits on their carbon emissions.  And Pennsylvania’s power plants are a big part of the problem, emitting more carbon pollution than power plants in all but four other states.  

But big utilities like GenOn, which have been allowed for decades to spew unlimited amounts of carbon pollution into our air, all while taking in enormous government subsidies, are sure to fight for more of the same.  They’ll join with the coal companies and spend millions on lobbying advertising to try and get off the hook for cutting carbon pollution from their dirty power plants. 

With your help, we can make history

Enough is enough, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency agrees.  Despite these powerful industry naysayers, the EPA is developing the first-ever carbon pollution standards for new power plants.

Now comes the hard part—getting these standards across the finish line and overcoming the corporate polluters’ opposition.  So we’re working closely with our allies in the public health community, working to rally tens of thousands of activists to stand up for public health and our environment.  

It won’t be easy, but if enough of us speak out, we can drown out the coal industry lobbyists and make sure EPA is allowed to do its job and protect public health.




Clean Air Updates

News Release | PennEnvironment

Citizens Rally to Expand Clean Energy in Pennsylvania

HARRISBURG– More than 100 residents across Pennsylvania traveled to the Capitol today with PennEnvironment to deliver a message to members of the General Assembly: it’s time to play a leadership role in pioneering climate and clean energy solutions.

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News Release | PennEnvironment

Smell Something? Say Something

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's CREATE Lab are rolling out new features in Smell PGH, a smartphone app that helps Pittsburgh area residents collectively report foul odors and alert each other to suspicious smells that waft through city neighborhoods and suburbs.

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News Release | PennEnvironment

Labor unions, parent groups, and health experts join Philly council members to announce citywide coalition to tackle environmental health threats in public schools

[Philadelphia] – As Philadelphia City Council heard testimony from concerned citizens at a public hearing about the city’s public schools, a powerful coalition of unusual suspects announced the kick-off of the “Philly Health Schools Initiative” to address significant building condition deficiencies and related environmental health threats found in public school buildings, including lead paint, asbestos, mold and other risks. 

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News Release | Environment Texas

Federal Court: Exxon Violated Clean Air Act Over 16,000 Times, Must Pay $19.95 Million Penalty

HOUSTON – A federal district court has ruled on a lawsuit brought against ExxonMobil in 2010 by PennEnvironment's sister organization Environment Texas and Sierra Club. They, with the help of National Environmental Law Center, sued Exxon for violating the Clean Air Act more than 16,000 times at its Baytown, Texas, refinery and chemical plant.

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News Release | PennEnvironment Policy & Research Center

Philadelphia and Pittsburgh rank in the top 3 smoggiest cities in the Northeast

[Philadelphia] —Philadelphians experienced 97 unhealthy air pollution days in 2015 increasing the risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts according to a new report from PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center.  

“Even one day with unhealthy air is too many,” said Ash Khayami, a Campaign Organizer with PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center.

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